Terracycle Turns Trash into Money for Bauerwood!

Parent volunteer extraordinaire, Becky Hilbelink, grew up hearing about the importance of recycling. Her father worked for waste companies for most of his working life and taught Becky and her siblings the value of recycling what we use and using things that be recycled. So it makes sense that Becky is the one responsible for bringing the familiar Terracycle bins to the Bauerwood entrance.

“I noticed TerraCycle printed on a carton of CapriSuns advertising that you could earn money for your child’s school.  I went to TerraCycle’s website, did some research on it, and then brought the idea to the Bauerwood parent club to help earn some money for the things that the parent club funds.”

Terracycle is an innovative recycling company that has become a global leader in recycling hard-to-recycle waste. Sponsoring companies pay for the shipping of the recyclables to TerraCycle, but schools must meet a certain weight requirement before shipping the items if you want credit for them.  TerraCycle pays 1-2 cents per piece that is recycled.  Twice a year checks are sent to schools and non-profits that have earned credit. Becky is willing to go above and beyond to do her dad proud!  “I sort the recyclables and store them in my garage until I have enough to send in.  My biggest challenge is finding large enough boxes to send in the recyclables!”

Students have readily jumped on board with their participation. “The students have done a great job recycling during the lunch periods.  It also helps when I have little contests to encourage the kids to remember to recycle.” The students can easily connect to the benefits of this program, “It helps earn money for the school.  I explain that the money is used for the playground balls, jump ropes, PE equipment, scissors in the classroom, all the “fun” worksheets they do, construction paper, art supplies, etc.” Of course, some kiddos simply understand they are doing something valuable, “Some of them also realize the importance of keeping trash out of the landfills as much as we can to help the planet.”

The different types of recyclables are organized into “brigades” and Becky is intentional about choosing brigades that are easily accessible for students during the lunch period. She also encourages students to bring in items from home. Currently, Bauerwood participates in five brigades, “The current ones are toothpaste/toothbrush products, Go-Go Squeez/squeezable fruit pouches, cereal bags/liners, personal care items [like shampoo, deodorant, soap containers, etc.], and snack/chip bags.” [Note: Unfortunately, Capri Sun discontinued their participation with Terracyle this year so Becky is currently on a waiting list for a different drink pouch brigade. Stay tuned!]

Since the inception of the Terracylce program at Bauerwood, the students have donated the following items:

Toothpaste tubes/brushes: 1194
Drink Pouches: 34,214
Go-Go Squeez/fruit pouches: 3431
Cereal Bags: 1112
Personal Care Items: 1299
Snack/Chip bags: 4841
Lunch kits: 401
Tape dispensers: 97
Glue containers: 469
If you’d like to join the Bauerwood brigades please bring your items to the bins in the lobby! If you’d like to inquire or start your Terracycle program, check out their website!

“I think it’s important for people to be conscientious about the impact we have on the environment and to do what they can to help preserve/protect it for future generations.  For example, I love going to the ocean, but don’t enjoy all the trash on the beaches.  It also allows the kids and the community to give back to the school in an easy, tangible way.  How easy is it to put your trash in a different container versus another?  It’s a simple way to earn money to buy the supplies necessary to continue providing a quality education for our most precious resource, our children.”

Thank you, Becky, for all you do for our Jenison students, teachers, and staff! We hope that our kids are taking what they’ve learned from this program into their daily lives and beyond!

Volunteers Keep Elementary Libraries Humming!

Diane Avink, Carolyn DeJong, Jan Staley, Becky Hilbelink

Elementary Media Specialist, Jan Staley, has many amazing superpowers: she can recommend the perfect book for any age, lesson, or situation, she can bring a smile to a student’s face by knowing what they’ll love, and she knows every story in the library inside and out. But there’s one thing she can’t do: she can’t run all five elementary libraries on her own, especially on a part-time schedule. But every superhero knows you need a sidekick, and Jan has 65! Every elementary school in Jenison has dedicated library volunteers who work every week to make sure our students have access to our amazing books!

Bauerwood volunteers, Carolyn DeJong, Diane Avink, and Becky Hilbelink have been volunteering in the libraries for between nine and thirteen years! They all got their start when a note went home asking for parents to volunteer in classrooms and they eventually made their way to the library – and haven’t left.

Becky worked as a special education teacher and took a step back when she had children so she knows the importance of school libraries. She also volunteered in her daughter’s classroom and found herself at home in the library. When she first started, her son [now in fifth grade] was in Kindergarten and he when he wasn’t serving as the library mascot of sorts, he was sleeping the back room. [It takes a lot of energy to be a mascot!] Becky is a dedicated Bauerwood volunteer outside of the library as well. She serves as the volunteer coordinator, organizes Watchdog Dads, runs the recycling program Teracycle, and she still volunteers for the classroom teachers.

Longtime Bauerwood volunteers Nell & Joe Abramajtys

The love of the work is what keeps these volunteers coming back year after year. Diane says, “It’s fun to watch the kids grow up.” And Becky adds that her passion for making sure kids experience an actual book in their hand [as opposed to a tablet or other technology] and has been known to dash over to her house – next door to Bauerwood – and grab a book from her personal library if the school doesn’t have it and a student is requesting it. Carolyn says that she loves getting Kindergarten students excited about reading in the hopes that their passion carries on over the years. And all the volunteers know books to recommend if someone comes to them and doesn’t love reading- yet.

Oftentimes, students will ask the volunteers for recommendations. Becky loves to suggest Harriot the Spy, Mr Popper’s Penguins, and Boxcar Children. Diane loves the Little House on the Prairie books. They love to ask the students when they return the books, “tell me what you thought” and see the excitement in their eyes at having discovered something new – especially the classics.

The library volunteers across the district stay very busy with a variety of tasks. As new books arrive, certain volunteers like Diane are in charge of cataloging them in the computer, checking books in and out, shelving, inventory, occasionally reading to classes, managing library cards, running overdue reports, organizing incentive programs like JPS Reads, and helping every student feel comfortable in the library.

Carolyn feels it’s especially important to help students cultivate a love of books and she takes the time to notice which students might need a little extra encouragement in this area. Becky agrees, saying that the library is a safe place for kids to come and explore. “Kids love coming to the library and it’s a wonderful connection to the community. A love of reading can start with the kids and draw parents in.”

Ms Staley knows that the personality of the library volunteers help shape the experience for children. For example, Sandy Hill parent volunteer Amanda VanMaanen begins each week with a whiteboard drawing straight from a page of a great book. Volunteers spark interest in books for students and make sure they know there is always a story to meet their passions. “Our volunteers love kids and love books. Kids have graduated and come back saying that they loved reading because of their experiences in their JPS libraries.”

Thank you Ms Staley, for dedicating your life to books, reading, and the wonderful ways reading enriches our lives! Thank you to all of the 65 JPS library volunteers who make a class trip to library something to look forward to! You are keeping our students interested and engaged in reading, changing their lives forever!

Let’s Read!

Did you read the Boxcar Children books as a child? They were first published in 1942 and written by Gertrude Chandler Warner about four orphaned children who create a home for themselves on an abandoned train car. Eventually, they are united with the kind [& wealthy!] grandfather who moves their beloved boxcar to his backyard so the children can use it as a playhouse. Gertrude Chandler Warner passed away in 1979 but her stories live on in a great new adventure series, starting with Journey on a Runaway Train!

Beginning February 19, you are invited to join the entire JPS family in reading this wonderful story together as a family. Your child will bring home an order form in their Friday Folder tomorrow and you can order the book for just $1! If your family reads two to three chapters each week, the story will be finished by the end of JPS Reads on March 16. Elementary Media Specialist, Jan Staley, knows how important it is to create a love of reading by practicing it as a family. “Reading together as a family, creates a strong foundation for literacy in your child’s life.” Also, by reading the same book as a community, “we help to create a shared reading experience for all of our elementary school families.”

If you, like Gertrude Chandler Warner, are intrigued by the idea of living on train car, then you will love the adventures the Alden children find themselves in this story! The children have been recruited by a secret society where they are tasked with returning ancient artifacts and treasures to their rightful locations, taking them all over the world! After finding an ancient painted turtle, they board a train to return it to New Mexico where it originated. To complicate things, however, they must deal with people who would rather the painted turtle is not returned home! Find out what happens with your entire family this month!

One difference in this reading initiative is that you won’t hear a lot about the book in your child’s classroom. “For this project, we are hoping that the value of literacy and reading out loud as a family will be carried into homes.” So parents, put on your “teacher hats” for a few minutes each night this month and join in the fun of reading together!

This story is incredibly accessible for kids of all ages. Most second and third graders will be able to read it on their own, but the story is fun for everyone. The littles will love following along with the adventures of the main characters and even your older kids will love the nostalgia of being read aloud to. It’s also a great opportunity around the dinner table to have a family book discussion about what everyone thinks might happen and highs and lows of the story so far. Your family can tailor the adventure to work for you!

We hope you will join JPS and The Boxcar Children as they take off on their latest mystery and your family finds its own adventure in reading together!

Look for the order form tomorrow and start reading on the 19th!

 

A Wonder-ful Field Trip for Bauerwood 5th Graders!

Last year, the fiction story, Wonder, by RL Palacio swept the country and made its way into the hearts of children and families everywhere, including Jenison. Wonder is the story of August, a fifth grade boy with facial differences who, up until the story begins, has been home schooled in an effort to protect him. However, his parents decide that he needs to experience more of the world and he is enrolled in a mainstreamed school for the first time. Auggie is faced with a series of antagonists as he struggles to find his spot in a new place but also finds friends and champions among the challenges. Wonder has been #1 on the New York Times Bestsellers List for 36 weeks, been read by more than 6 million people and launched the Choose Kind Movement.

The 5th graders at Bauerwood joined in the fun by reading Wonder as a class book this year. Kathie Berens, Bauerwood 5th grade teacher says the experience of reading the book as a grade-level has been impactful for students. “Some of the reading was done as a whole group, some was done with partners, and some was done independently. It was a awesome to bring the reading back to a whole group discussion and allow each student to experience the journey of Auggie, Via and the rest of the characters together. We ended the Wonder-ful experience by creating yearbooks for Beecher Prep Middle School [Auggies school] filled with main events, important quotes, and favorite parts from the book.”

Students loved the book and despite it’s 300+ pages, they “ate it all up”! Students talked a lot about feelings and perspectives demonstrated in the story, as well as practiced their prediction skills.

One of the main themes in the story is the precept [guiding rule] that Mr Brown, Auggie’s teacher, presents in the story: When given the choice between right and being kind, choose kind. Ms Berens and the other teachers have encouraged students to take this idea into their own lives and they believe that this small statement, along with Auggie’s experience, will go a long way for them.

Piggybacking on this precept, teachers had each student design themselves as their own Wonder. Students used a computer website to design their face, then sketched and sharpie marked their design on a t-shirt with “Choose Kind” on the backs. Finally, they tie-died their shirts in Wonder blue [to match the cover] and everyone wore their shirts on their field trip.

To put an exclamation point on the experience of this story, the entire 5th grade class went to see the movie last Friday. This community-based experience gave students the chance to see the story come to life and even critique the differences between the book and movie.

“The kids LOVED the movie. We talked about the fact that we cried at some parts and laughed at other parts.  It created a whole new level of emotional response and allowed students who struggle reading to visualize, create a picture for what they’ve read. We also discussed some of the differences between the book and the movie. Even though a few parts like the field trip and the relationships between Summer and Justin were different than in the book, it was still really fabulous to see the story come alive like what we saw with the movie in our heads as we read the book. I am so glad students were able to see the movie. There were mixed reviews on who preferred the book and the movie. It was a special opportunity that we all were able to experience both.”

Ms Berens looks forward to seeing how students will continue to exhibit the precept of choosing kindness in their classrooms and lives. “Wonder the book, and movie, share common themes of kindness, friendship and courage. Our class has latched onto Mr. Brown’s first precept in the book, “When given the choice between being right and being kind… choose kind.” We understand that kindness is a choice that we can make every day and that it’s a choice that makes a huge difference in the lives around us. A way we can make a difference each and every day is to choose kind.”

Thank you, Bauerwood teachers, for bringing this amazing story to our students and going above and beyond to make it meaningful for them! We know that these experiences will shape who they are and who they are becoming and they are all Wonder-ful!

Do you know how to follow the Group Plan?

Chances are, your JPS students are probably familiar with language like “the group plan” and “keeping your body in the group”. These phrases and concepts are part of a learning tool called “Social Thinking” and they help instruct our kiddos on expected and unexpected behaviors in various settings. For example, when your family visit a restaurant, it is unexpected to stand on your chair and ask for a milk refill but expected to say “thank you” to the server when they deliver your meal!

Language like “keeping your body in the group” helps teachers point out when a student has left a group situation and it is expected to stay with your peers [i.e. walking too quickly or too slowly down the hall with a small group]. Social Thinking also teaches students to keep their “brains in the group” by reminding them to stay focused on the topic being discussed and how it helps the people around you feel comfortable when they know you are listening.

Teacher Consultant, Kristen Gray, shares the ins and outs of this valuable teaching tool: “Social Thinking is not one curriculum, but rather defines a methodology that is taught using a variety of materials based on the age and characteristics of the students being taught.  Michelle Garcia Winner, a speech language pathologist, created the concept of social thinking in the mid-1990s, then opened the Social Thinking company which produces the majority of the curricula we use.  We began teaching it in Jenison approximately 8 years ago.  It was initially introduced in the categorical programs for students on the Autism Spectrum, and grew from there.”

Ms Gray, School Social Worker, Aimee Jackson, and Behavior Specialist, Yvette Smith, have worked to develop comprehensive curriculum plans for a variety of age levels in Jenison. This month, Social Thinking was also begun for Sandy Hill’s youngest students with a lesson on Whole Body Listening.

Social Thinking is generating positive changes for students. “In my opinion, the biggest change I have observed with Social Thinking is a shift in mindset when students recognize their ability to at least partially control the social environment and other’s responses to them.  This, in turn, can influence the way a student feels about him or herself.

For example, if a student struggles to work in a group, the student might feel as though the other kids do not like him/her and choose to not include him/her in a group.  Using social behavior mapping, one of the tools in social thinking, we can break down both the unexpected and expected behaviors associated with working in a group.  We then help the students to develop visual maps of how these behaviors might make others feel, what outcomes might occur because of how others are feeling, and finally how the student might feel about himself/herself based on the responses he/she is receiving.  The student can use this information to change behaviors, thereby changing outcomes and potentially changing feelings.  I have observed many students experience a “light bulb moment” when they suddenly connect their behaviors to the outcomes experienced.”

If social skills have always come naturally to you, you may not notice that having these skills is woven into every aspect of life. “A person’s social thinking ability has a considerable affect on his or her relationships and success in school and at work. It affects the person’s social skills, perspective taking, self-awareness, self-regulation, critical thinking, social problem solving, play skills, reading comprehension, written expression, ability to learn and work in a group, organizational skills, etc.. Nearly all job growth since 1980 has been in occupations that are relatively social-skill intensive, while jobs that require high levels of analytical and mathematical reasoning, but low levels of social interaction, and jobs that are comparatively easy to automate, have fared comparatively poorly.  The research indicated that workers with greater social skills are more likely to work in social skill-intensive and less-routine occupations and to earn a relatively higher wage return in these occupations.”

Using the analogy of an iceberg, Social Thinking is a tool that “teaches below the surface” and our social responses are what is visible but what is below the surface [social attention, interpretation, problem-solving] are what drives those responses. “Truly, it is empowering for students once they realize that they have the ability to change how others think and feel about them by changing their behavior.”

We love the thoughtful work of our support staff members who strive to equip students with as many tools as they need for success! And thank you to our teachers for incorporating something new into your already busy days!

[*Photos courtesy of http://www.socialthinking.com]

Kindness Rocks!

Bauerwood art teacher, Ashley Hankamp, first heard about Kindness Rocks on social media and thought it would be a great tool for Jenison kids. After presenting the idea to the ‘be nice‘ team, it was decided that there was no better way to kick off the 2017 school year than with a focus on kindness and “encouraging Bauerwood students to be a positive force in the world”!

Megan Murphy lives in Massachusetts and began the Kindness Rocks Project [watch her touching story here] and now, installations of encouragement can be found all over the country. Ms Hankamp applied for a grant from the JPEF in order to purchase the special paints needed to begin the project at the elementary schools in Jenison and during professional development in August, teachers kicked off the project.

“The staff completed their rock before school started so students could be surrounded and inspired by uplifting words to start their school year. The staff rocks are currently on display in the art room and the students enjoy reading the messages on the rocks when they come to art each week. ” Students have begun crafting their rocks of encouragement as well. “For my upper elementary students I am having the students focus on a positive message that inspires them and will inspire others. For lower elementary students, I am using the book Only One You by Linda Kranz for inspiration. This book unites art and literature in a beautiful way and explores the theme of making the world a better place!”

This simple way of touching those around us – especially our immediate school family – is catching on. “The students are engaged and invested in making their rock a special piece of the installation. The conversations about love and kindness that the students are having while they are creating their rocks is truly heart warming. When all of the rocks are completed they will be sprayed with a waterproof sealant and be put on display outside the front of the school in the landscaping.”

We hope you will take the time to look around, appreciate, and be uplifted by the Kindness Rocks Project at your school. “This installation will be a visual reminder for students, staff, and Bauerwood families to spread kindness and to make the world a better place. I am beyond excited to see how the students’s rocks and the actual installation turns out. It definitely will be a work of art with a beautiful message!”

Thank you, art teachers, for using your talent and passion to encourage our schools as well as remind our students of the power in supporting others! We look forward to seeing the finished installations and even more so, the benefits of a encouraging school family!

 

Summer Series: Student Art Sample [4th Grade]

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Over the course of our summer we will feature various artists and art pieces from each Jenison elementary school as well as the Junior High and High School. Each piece was carefully chosen by our art teachers and we hope you will enjoy the talents and hard work of our students while you also enjoy a beautiful and relaxing summer!

“Tropical Toucan”
By Jordan Guyot
Bauerwood Elementary

For this project the students learned about the tropical rain forest, why rain forests are being destroyed, and discussed ways they could be restored and preserved.  It was a lot of fun listening to the 4th graders’ conversations on these topics.

Once the students learned about tropical rain forests they went on to demonstrate their observational drawing skills.  They looked at images and videos of tropical toucans.  Then they were instructed to observes the shapes, colors, and details of toucans.  Next they used their observational drawing skills to draw a realistic toucan.

First, the students drew the toucans in pencil then they outlined them with oil pastels.  Next, they went on to paint them with watercolor to demonstrate the wax resist painting technique.  The students were instructed to experiment with color mixing and to create realistic colors that would be seen on toucans and in the rain forest.  It was really fun to see how every student put their own twist on this project and every painting was unique.

Jordan Guyot is a very talented young artist whose artwork always stands out.  She displays superb craftsmanship and creativity.  She is always willing to take the extra time to make her art one of a kind, which sets her apart from her class. While creating this mixed media toucan Jordan had a specific vision in mind, and she executed her vision beautifully.  I cannot wait to see the future creations of this budding artist!

Jordan and her artwork were chosen by her Bauerwood Elementary art teacher, Ashley Hankamp.

There’s Nothing Quite Like 6th Grade Camp!

If you grew up as a JPS student, chances are good that you attended 6th grade camp! For at least the past eighteen years, each school in the district has set aside 4 days each year for the 6th grade class to spend at a camp in the area.

The students take part in various activities such as ropes courses, horseback riding, biking, archery, team-building exercises, campfires, and group games like capture the flag and glow dodge ball. They also spend time with the students in their cabins to continue to build and develop peer relationships.

6th grade teacher, Heather Chatfield, is the Camp Director for Bauerwood and says the Tuesday to Friday camp experience at Grace Adventures is an important experience for the students to learn new skills, unplug, and enjoy being together. Of course, the students can’t go alone so each school depends on volunteers. Bauerwood typically takes 9 – 10 teachers from the building plus 6 – 12 junior counselors who are willing and enthusiastic high school students eager to make camp amazing for every student, just like it was for them.

In order to make camp a meaningful experience for these rising junior high students they are encouraged to expand their comfort zones and be brave. “We focus on this time being a team building experience. We also look at it as a way to get students to challenge themselves to do something new.” When students are encouraged by their peers and feel safe to try new things, they feel changed and teachers see an improvement in their demeanor and self-image. “We have so many kids that come back from camp feeling more confident and successful.”

Other wonderful benefits of camp is the opportunity for students to put down their devices, engage with their friends, and be challenged in new ways. “6th grade camp is a time for kids to “unplug” from today’s technology that is readily available. They are able to be physically active for four days. They have to communicate and push themselves more than ever before. The teachers love the experience because we get to know our students even better during this week at camp!”

Thank you to all of the teachers and high school students who attend camp and make it amazing for our 6th graders! We know that these experiences are helping to shape them into strong, confident, junior high students!

6th Graders Keep Kindergartners Safe!

When you’re a Kindergartner, it can be intimidating to navigate the big, busy halls at school! But fear not, young ones! The 6th grade safeties are here!

At each Jenison elementary school, there are a dedicated group of 6th graders who fulfill a variety of protective roles for our Kindergartners. Kevin Gort, 6th grade teacher at Bauerwood and Leader of the Safeties says, “The roles range from helping Kindergartners get to their correct buses to standing out at the crosswalk in freezing cold temperatures waiting for the crossing guard to stop traffic on Bauer Road so the kids can cross safely.”

There is a process to becoming a safety and it begins in 5th grade with a presentation by current safeties sharing what they like and don’t like about the position, qualities you need to succeed at being a safety and why they chose to fulfill this role. If a 5th grader is interested they complete an application and 5th grade teachers are given a chance to weigh in as well, with remarks such as “turns homework in on time”, “has integrity”, “is kind of others”, and “respects authority”.  Even specials teachers are given the opportunity to voice their opinion on applicants because they get to know students in a unique environment, over multiple years. Once the roster is selected, training begins.

Mr Gort looks for three things in a potential safety: integrity, empathy, and willingness to problem solve. These three qualities show that a safety can be trusted to act appropriately, even when an adult may not be present, which is a major piece of responsibility for a safety, especially when it comes to managing disagreements between other students. “There is not a lot of glory or awards associated with being a safety, but many student safeties will tell you that the reward is in those Kindergartners’ hugs and smiles that are given or in the few thank you’s from parents and/or staff members that are said to a safety as they hold the door open. ”

If you think the Kindergartner doesn’t know or appreciate their safety, Mr Gort says, think again. “I am always amazed at the bonds the safeties make with the little ones they take care of.  I do not think these safeties know how important they are and how their Kindergartners look forward to seeing them everyday. One story in regards to how impressionable a safety is to a Kindergartner happened at 6th grade camp.  I was with a Junior Counselor, who is in high school, and a 6th grade student walked right up to him and said “you were my safety when I was in Kindergarten.” Both the high school student and the 6th grade student began talking about what bus they transported to, the other students in the line, etc.  I was amazed that this memory stuck with this student for so many years. ”

Because the qualities of a good safety [problem solving, integrity, and empathy] are valuable, lifelong skills, the role of a safety carries on well past 6th grade. “When students move on with life after being a safety my hope is that they find other ways to serve in this world.  Helping others without having to be recognized or rewarded is a quality that seems to be missing these days.  Having a selfless servant heart is something to strive for everyday and a great place to start is finding a way to help another person.”

“If I could challenge the Jenison community…no matter what building you live by or whether your kids attend school, it would be absolutely awesome if you would thank a safety for faithfully serving their school.  You would make a safety’s day if you went out of your way just to say thank you.

Thank you Mr. Gort! We’ll start the “thank you’s” right here: THANK YOU 6th grade safeties across the district! Our schools and our youngest elementary students are better and safer because of you! [Now, entire JPS community, it’s your turn to tell a safety “thank you”!]

Dads and Daughters Take a Spin Around the Dance Floor!

Last weekend, the gym at Bauerwood was transformed into a tropical luau for the annual Daddy-Daughter Dance! This year, 280 girls and the men in their lives that serve as fathers (grandparents, uncles, cousins, brothers, friends – anyone!) danced, took selfies, drank fruity umbrella-adorned punch, and had an amazing time!

Last year, committee co-leader, Jean Houghton, talked to other moms about the possibility of bringing the dance to Bauerwood after experiencing it at Bursley before their family moved. It took this dedicated group to plan, organize, decorate, and now, in its second year, it’s the second highest fundraiser for the school! This year, the dance generated about $1000 to school expenses.

There was a DJ spinning the tunes and he also led a limbo contest, and, according to Jean, the dance floor was filled the entire night. “The girls are so excited to be there, they have big smiles, and are happy to be there with their dads.” The girls received a Hawaiian lei when they arrive and a carnation when they leave to cap off their “wow” experience.

This year, the committee was able to provide limited sponsorship to families that needed financial assistance but they plan to increase their capability in this area for next year. “No student should be left out because things are tight at home”. [So if you’re wondering about next year, make sure you talk to your child’s teacher when the time comes around!]

Jean feels that this type of event is important for families because it “shines a spotlight on the girls’ relationship with their father figure. They are encouraged to feel beautiful, they feel important on that day, it gives them confidence, and makes a special moment to share with each other.” She added that it’s encouraging to hear from teachers and other parents how excited their daughters are before and after the dance. “They can’t stop talking about it!”

This is clearly a special treat for our daughters and their dads and we are thankful that parents take this time to make special memories with their kids! [Moms! Be watching for Mother – Son Bowling at your school!]

Thank you to the dance committee: Alyssa Fennema, Candace Bennett, Jean Houghton, Liz Opatic, Sara Reilly, and Missy Brandt!

Parents make all the difference and this event is so much more than a fundraiser! Thank you to all the dads and daughters who brightened the gyms around Jenison with your beautiful smiles and amazing dance moves!